Former Sanger QB can absolutely sling it

Sanger junior quarterback Dane Evans (17) hurls a pass to junior wide receiver Jay Cain (18) as Argyle junior linebacker Carston Bossow (43) tries to intercept, Friday, November 5, 2010 in Sanger.

Sanger junior quarterback Dane Evans (17) hurls a pass to junior wide receiver Jay Cain (18) as Argyle junior linebacker Carston Bossow (43) tries to intercept, Friday, November 5, 2010 in Sanger.

If you’ve been around this area for more than a few years, you remember the name Dane Evans.

The former Sanger quarterback finished his high school career among the all-time leading passers in Texas high school history and helped turn Sanger into a perennial contender with an instant shot of offense he gave the Indians after bursting onto the scene in 2010 and leading all Dallas-Fort Worth area 4A players in passing.

Evans went on to have a standout career for Tulsa — staking a real claim as the most successful collegiate quarterback to ever come out of this area.

The numbers speak for themselves, regardless of system at Tulsa. Evans finished his career with the Golden Hurricane with a bowl win in December and ended up with 11,680 career passing yards with 84 touchdown passes and 47 interceptions.

That leads us to the other day, when Evans was filmed training for the upcoming NFL Draft. One of his passes was clocked at a remarkable 61 mph — better than the Combine record of 60 mph from Logan Thomas in 2014, which broke the previous record of 59 mph held by Colin Kaepernick.

Evans has an outside chance of being drafted, but he’ll definitely end up in someone’s camp, and he’s landed on several “sleeper lists,” including this one published back in September. There’s some truth to him being a product of Tulsa’s high-octane offensive system, but there’s also obvious truth to him being a guy with a cannon where his right arm should be.

It’ll be interesting to follow Evans throughout this process leading up to the draft in April and see what happens.

Guyer freshman gets first college offer

Guyer freshman running back Noah Cain (22) evades a tackle by Southlake Carroll junior defensive back Jake Murphy (18), Friday, November 20, 2015, at Eagle Stadium in Allen, TX. David Minton/DRC

Guyer freshman running back Noah Cain (22) evades a tackle by Southlake Carroll junior defensive back Jake Murphy (18), Friday, November 20, 2015, at Eagle Stadium in Allen, TX. David Minton/DRC

Not to downgrade any Division I athletic offer, but to make a big deal out of a Tulsa offer might be a bit weird on the surface.

But in my 11 years of doing this at two different daily papers (the last nine here in Denton), I saw something today that I’ve never seen, as Tulsa made a scholarship offer to Guyer freshman — yes, FRESHMAN — Noah Cain.

Is this unheard of? No, but again, it’s something I’ve never seen with a school(s) I cover. Lane Kiffin has famously, or infamously, offered an eighth-grader, so stuff like this happens, but it’s not common.

Of course, as we all know, Cain is a really special talent. As a freshman, yes a 14-year-old, he ran for 1,058 on 112 carries (9.4 yards per carry) and 10 touchdowns, and that was after he missed a few games with a broken hand. To put that in layman’s terms, that’s basically a first down every time he touched the ball. The one thing Cain seemed to lack at times was home run speed, but he made up for it with an insane ability to bounce off tacklers and run with some serious force and aggression. It’s rare enough to see a freshman running back excel for a high-level varsity program, but to do it by mixing it up in between the tackles was even more impressive. Oh, and that speed? It will come with an offseason or two in Guyer’s renowned strength and conditioning program. Hell, it might already be there for all we know, and I’ll find out when spring football begins on Monday.

Bottom line, Cain is going to be special, and I wouldn’t be shocked at all if Tulsa just started a flood of offers for him. Again, nothing at all against Tulsa, but don’t be shocked when the big boys of college football start throwing offers his way even though he won’t graduate high school until 2019.